Fake Foods pt. 2

Red apple in genetic engineering laboratory, gmo food concept

Fake Olive Oil

olive oil may not be what the label claims: 100% pure olive oil. There’s a good chance the bottle on your pantry shelf has been mixed with other oils. Is that really such a big deal? It is if you’re allergic to peanut oil, which is commonly mixed with olive oil in an act of food fraud.

Pancake Syrup

Maple syrup comes from sap from a maple tree. The sap is boiled and becomes the sticky stuff you know as maple syrup. Pancake syrup (also called table syrup) is not the same. Pancake syrup’s main ingredients are corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup

Tilefish

Wrongfully convicted Men! Speak criminal justice and race Pt. 1

Arrested man in handcuffs

“We know the truth,” said Morgan, speaking Saturday evening (May 27, 2018) as part of a panel on mass incarceration and stereotyping. “We’re trying to present the truth to our community because we’re eager to serve. To whom much is given, much is owed.” Jerome Morgan puts it, “I went into prison at 17 and came out at 37.” He knew he was innocent the whole time, and it took 20 years before he was able to leave the penitentiary as a free and exonerated man .

Morgan’s 1993 murder case, in which the then 19-year-old New Orleanian was convicted of shooting dead a fellow teenager at a Sweet 16 party. Now freed, Morgan has joined with two other wrongfully and overly convicted men to preach the pitfalls of overzealous prosecution and how the image of black men as criminals worsens social, economic and racial marginalization.    Reflecting on his experience, Jones, 44, told the roughly 100 attendees in the church about his decades at Angola – which he, likewise, called “a slave plantation” – stemming from a conviction related to a 1992 French Quarter crime spree that culminated in murder and landed him a life sentence. Like Morgan, Jones enlisted Innocence Project New Orleans to assist in convincing judges decades later that he had been wrongfully convicted, citing lack of evidence. Jones was released in January 2018 on his 44th birthday. Daniel Rideau, who was 19-years old at the time, was handed a life sentence in the 1994 shooting death of a man . He was released in 2003 after his conviction was dropped. The judge in Rideau’s appeal ruled prosecutors withheld information that could have helped his defense at trial back in 1995. “They don’t care if you’re innocent,” Rideau said. “They want that conviction.” “Being bitter holds you back,” said Jones, who endured the longest prison stint at 23 years. “I hold onto the positive things in my life. Hold onto the truth.” The trio opened a barbershop at the beginning of this year, called Real Gentlemen Barbershop. Since its opening, the shop has become more than just a place to get a good haircut: it’s emerge as a hub for positive youth mentorship and anti-mass incarceration activism in a city with a high incarceration rate. The barber shop serves as the meeting grounds for the nonprofit Free-Dem Foundations, which Morgan, Jones and Rideau co-founded earlier this year. Their aim is to show how young black man can contribute in positive ways to their community, despite hardships and mistakes. “I’m obligated to try to make a difference,” Rideau said. “It’s an everyday struggle.” What these three men all faced in the justice system did not persuade them to lose hope or stop a drive to improve their communities.    Pt. 1

article by: ghost writer

Download- MasterBarber, The Magazine Mobile App. We’re More Than Hair

 

 

Short Takes: Restoring Voting Rights(ex-felons)

Politician swearing an oath with fingers crossed behind back

More than 6 million American citizens are unable to vote because of a past criminal conviction. As many as 4.7 million of these citizens live, work, and raise families in our communities. But because of a conviction in their past they are still denied this fundamental democratic right. These laws, deeply rooted in our troubled racial history, have a disproportionate impact on minorities. Across the country, one in every 13 voting-age African Americans have lost their right to vote, which is four times the rate for all other Americans.

Racism & Felony Disenfranchisement

The United States stands alone among modern democracies in stripping voting rights from millions of citizens on the basis of criminal convictions.

The United States stands alone among modern democracies in stripping voting rights from millions of citizens on the basis of criminal convictions! Lifetime felon voting ban lawsuit filed in Mississippi . Mississippi’s constitution bars its citizens from voting ever again after being convicted of felonies. “Once you’ve paid your debt to society, I believe you should be allowed to participate again,” said plaintiff Kamal Karriem, a 58-year-old former Columbus city councilman who pleaded guilty to embezzlement in 2005 after being charged with stealing a city cellphone. “I don’t think it should be held against you for the rest of your life.” 

Voting age citizens convicted of a felony are barred from voting for some period of time. While many states restore voting rights to individuals automatically after they exit jail or prison, others permanently disenfranchise people with a past felony conviction or require they petition the government to have their right restored.

Voting rights retained while incarcerated for a felony conviction in: Maine and Vermont. Voting rights restored automatically upon release from prison in: The District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Utah. Voting rights restored automatically once released from prison and discharged from parole (probationers can vote) in: California, Colorado, Connecticut, and New York.

Voting rights restored automatically upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation in: Alaska, Arizona ,Arkansas, Georgia , Idaho, Kansas , Louisiana Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas , Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. Voting rights restoration is dependent on the type of conviction and/or the outcome of an individual petition or application to the government in: Alabama , Delaware, Mississippi, Nevada,Tennessee, and Wyoming. Voting rights can ONLY be restored through an individual petition or application to the government in: Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, and Virginia.

Say No To GMO’s Pt. 1

Red apple in genetic engineering laboratory, gmo food concept

Part 1.  GMO defined-The abbreviation for genetically modified organism. A GMO is an organism whose genome has been altered by the techniques of genetic engineering so that its DNA contains one or more genes not normally found there. A high percentage of food crops, such as corn and soybeans, are genetically modified. GMO (genetically modified organism) is the result of a laboratory process where genes from the DNA of one species are extracted and artificially forced into the genes of an unrelated plant or animal. … Because this involves the transfer of genes,GMOs are also known as “transgenic” organisms. Currently commercialized GMO crops in the U.S. include soy (94%), cotton (90%), canola (90%), sugar beets (95%), corn (88%), Hawaiian papaya (more than 50%), zucchini and yellow squash (over 24,000 acres).

Genetically modified foods have been linked to toxic and allergic reactions, sick, sterile, and dead livestock, and damage to virtually every organ studied in lab animals. The effects on humans of consuming these new combinations of proteins produced in GMOs are unknown and have not been studied. Crops such as Bt cotton produce pesticides inside the plant. This kills or deters insects, saving the farmer from having to spray pesticides. Farmers in India, who let their sheep graze on Bt cotton plants after the harvest, saw thousands of sheep die!

GMO Health Risk According to the Institute for Responsible Technology, “Human studies show how genetically modified (GM) food can leave material behind inside us, possibly causing long-term problems. Genes inserted into GM soy, for example, can transfer into the DNA of bacteria living inside us, and that the toxic insecticide produced by GMO corn was found in the blood of pregnant women and their unborn fetuses.”

Seven ways that GMOs may adversely affect health:

1. Food allergy – “The list of GMO food products intersect with the eight m ost common food allergens: eggs, milk, fish, peanuts, shellfish, soy, tree nuts, and wheat.” OCA states that protein in foods is what triggers allergic reactions and “most of the foreign proteins being gene-spliced into foods have never been eaten by humans before or tested for their safety.”

2. Toxicity – “A review of 19 studies (including industry’s own studies submitted to regulators in support of applications to commercialise GMO crops) on mammals fed with commercialised GM soy and maize that are already in our food and feed chain found consistent toxic effects on the liver and kidneys,” reports GMO education.

3. Infertility – According to the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, “There is more than a casual association between GMO foods and adverse health effects.” In a study on GMO corn and fertility there was a “significant decrease in offspring over time and significantly lower litter weight in mice fed GMO corn.”

4. Gluten Disorders – In a 2013 report released by the Institute for Responsible Technology, internist Emily Linder MD states, “Based on my clinical experience, when I remove genetically modified foods as part of the treatment for gluten sensitivity, recovery is faster and more complete. I believe that GMO’s in our diet contribute to the rise in gluten sensitivity in the U.S. population.”

5. DNA Transfer – GMO’s are created using horizontal gene transfers as opposed to natural reproduction, which is accomplished via vertical gene transfer.

6. Birth defects – Glyphosate is the active ingredient in the herbicide RoundUp. Monsanto Company, considered the giant of GMOs, engineers “RoundUp Ready” crops that are routinely treated with the herbicide. According to Andres Carrasco, head of the molecular Embryology Lab at the University of Buenos Aires glyphosate “is responsible for causing birth defects, infertility, sperm destruction, and cancer.”

7. Cancer – A study that linked GMO’s and Round Up to cancer was first published in 2012, was retracted in 2013 and republished in 2014.

By Ghost Part 1 of 2

 

 

Discrepancy? Legal R Not

Cannabis cola (Thousand Oaks marijuana strain)

Marijuana Arrests by the Numbers According to the ACLU’s original analysis, marijuana arrests now account for over half of all drug arrests in the United States. Despite roughly equal usage rates, Blacks are 3.73 times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana. Billions of taxpayer dollars fund these arrests, which disproportionately target Black people. Wasted Time and Money: Enforcing marijuana laws costs us about $3.6 billion a year, yet the War on Marijuana has failed to diminish the use or availability of marijuana.  Between 2001 and 2010, there were over 8 million pot arrests in the U.S. That’s one bust every 37 seconds and hundreds of thousands ensnared in the criminal justice system. Police arrest more people for marijuana use than for all violent crimes — combined . On any given day in the United States, at least 137,000 people sit behind bars on simple drug-possession charges according to the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch. More than one of every nine arrests by state law enforcement is for drug possession, amounting to more than 1.25 million arrests each year.” 

Drug cops raid an 81-year-old woman’s garden to take out one marijuana plant. Marijuana is legal in Colorado It’s still illegal for kids to possess,juveniles are coming to dominate the marijuana arrests in Colorado. But another startling trend also has developed: Arrest rates have risen dramatically for young blacks and Latinos. “Police do patrol more in neighborhoods of color, ” he says. police show up and find kids illegally possession they’re obligated to do something